Chicago Cubs All-Time Lists

Chicago Cubs: A look back at great North Side pitchers of the 1990s

October 13, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago Cubs former player Kerry Wood throws out the ceremonial first pitch before the Cubs play against the St. Louis Cardinals in game four of the NLDS at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports
October 13, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago Cubs former player Kerry Wood throws out the ceremonial first pitch before the Cubs play against the St. Louis Cardinals in game four of the NLDS at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports /
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Oct 28, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; Fans gather outside of Wrigley Field before game three of the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians. Mandatory Credit: Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports /

Randy Myers sets team’s all-time single-season saves record

An Eastern Illinois University standout, Randy Myers left his mark on Chicago Cubs record books in just his first season on the North Side.

Not only was he impressive with the Cubs, but by the time he hung up his spikes, Myers racked up a staggering 347 saves in his big league career. That figure ranks 12th on Major League Baseball’s all-time list, topping well-known names like Rollie Fingers, Goose Gossage and Bruce Sutter.

Signed as a free agent ahead of the 1993 season, the southpaw brought a solid resume with him to Chicago. Coming off a 38-save campaign, he brought stability to the back of the Cubs’ pen.

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Myers absolutely dominated left-handed hitters that season, limiting them to a .178/.302/.289 slash line. It didn’t really matter where he pitched – at Wrigley Field or on the road – he was the epitome of consistence for the Cubs.

It was down the stretch though that Myers proved his worth. Over the season’s final month, he racked up 16 saves, pitching to a 2.08 earned run average over that stretch. When the pressure was on (in save situations) he was notably better than in non-save situations, with an ERA roughly three runs lower.

Furthermore, in what Baseball Reference deemed ‘high leverage’ situations, Myers limited opponents to a .174/.254/.222 slash-line.

Sure, most Cubs fans will remember Myers from 1995, when he allowed a long-ball that cost the Cubs a shot at the NL wild card berth in late September. In a game against the Astros at Wrigley Field, pinch-hitter James Mouton clubbed a two-run homer in the eighth. A fan then promptly jumped from the stands and attacked Myers, but that’s another story altogether.

For now, let’s just appreciate how good Myers, who was a member of the Reds’ Nasty Boys bullpen in 1990 was for a Cubs team that won just 84 games. 53 saves is nothing to shake your head at – especially when that accounts for roughly 63 percent of a team’s wins.

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