Cubs fans will remember broadcaster Vin Scully fondly

Chicago Cubs icon Ernie Banks was graduating from Booker T. Washington High School in 1950 when Vin Scully began his 67-year run calling Dodgers baseball. The Dodgers were still in Brooklyn and Jackie Robinson was in the prime of his career. Today we mourn the loss of the legendary sportscaster, who passed away Tuesday at the age of 94.

As someone who called National League baseball for so long, Scully made his way to Wrigley Field many times. He called Dodger games against the Cubs over many eras, from Banks and Ryne Sandberg to Sammy Sosa and Kris Bryant. Stadiums came and went over his broadcasting tenure, but Wrigley Field was the one National League park that stood over his entire career. Like so many fans across sports, Cubs fans certainly have fond memories of him.

Recounting some Cubs memories with the legendary Vin Scully

During his 2016 send-off season, Scully got to call an inning of a Cubs/Dodgers game on the WGN broadcast. “Good afternoon, Cubs fans,” he said in such a welcoming voice. He reminisced about his trips to Wrigley Field and the days Pat Pieper addressed the public at the park. Joe Maddon and David Ross (who began his career with the Dodgers) gifted Scully the #67 from the Wrigley scoreboard, the “Dodgers” flag from the standings pole and Maddon’s t-shirts.

But there was so much more that happened over the previous years.

Scully famously called Sandy Koufax’s perfect game against the Cubs on September 9, 1965 at Dodger Stadium. This was the last time the Cubs got no-hit until Cole Hamels did it against them in 2015. In more recent years, he called Derrek Lee’s 5-for-5 game at Dodger Stadium on June 1, 2005. It was just too bad he did not get to call any postseason games on the North Side.

It is worth watching him narrate a short monologue on Wrigley Field on its 75th birthday in 1989.

“75 years old. Proud head held high, and not a hair out of place. Awaiting yet another date with destiny.” -Vin Scully on Wrigley Field

One of his best moments with Cubs fans was when he honored the late Harry Caray by singing the stretch at Wrigley Field on April 19, 1998. Of all the guest singers to sing the sacred tune at Wrigley, Scully stands out as one of the best to do it. He showed nothing but class and said he was “honored” to sing the stretch. Not to mention a pretty solid singing voice These are the kinds of things that stick with fans. That was what Scully was capable of doing.

Today we say rest in peace to one of the most influential sports media figures to ever live. His legacy will live on in the hearts of so many. On behalf of Cubs fans, and baseball fans, here’s to you, Vin Scully.