Chicago Cubs: Ranking the top five Kyle Schwarber moments

(Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
(Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) /
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Chicago Cubs / Kyle Schwarber
(Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) /

Chicago Cubs: The ball is on the scoreboard

The greatest gif ever created is one of Schwarber sending a moonshot on top of the Wrigley scoreboard with a laser tail. I’d say I’m alone in my ability to watch that clip over and over and over again, but I know I’m not. I’ve seen the gif used so many times when discussing Schwarber, the Cubs and home runs on Twitter that it’s practically the epitome of monster shots.

While the home run is just absolutely breathtaking and awe-inspiring because of the confluence of raw power, trajectory, and its final resting place, the fact is that the situation was the best part of the bomb.

The St. Louis Cardinals have long been the bigger, stronger, faster, smarter and better-looking older brother to the Cubs. They’ve won historically, they’ve won lately and they’ve been a model franchise just about every step of the way. Heck, their fans are even considered the “best fans in baseball.” There’s a lot of envy that emanates from Cubs fans when it comes to the Cards, and it seems as though the players feel it too. While it isn’t quite Yankees-Red Sox in terms of rivalry, it may very well be the second best in the majors. Problem is, the Cards have always won.

That is, until 2015. Despite having won the division in an incredible three-horse race in ’15, the Cardinals actually may have been considered the underdogs in the NLDS matchup against the Cubs considering how hot Chicago was coming into the series. After winning Game 1 4-0, the Cards may have thought they could turn that momentum around. Not so fast though, as the Cubs won the next three – including Game 4 at Wrigley, when Schwarber hit his mammoth blast off left-hander Kevin Siegrist (who was 7-1 with a 2.17 ERA that year, no less) to put the Cubs up 6-4 in the seventh inning, completely demoralizing every St. Louis fan and player.

It eventually landed on top of the Budweiser scoreboard and was even encased in plastic as a testament to majesty and moment.