Chicago Cubs: Sosa and McGwire’s “Long Gone Summer” is almost here

CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 18: This 18 August 1998 file photo shows St. Louis Cardinals player Mark McGwire (R) hugging Chicago Cubs player Sammy Sosa before their game at Wrigley Field in Chicago, IL. Currently McGwire has 59 homeruns and Sosa 56, giving both players a chance to break the single season record of 61 set in 1961 by New York Yankees player Roger Maris. Despite the competition between them to be the first to break the record, they are close friends. (Photo credit should read FILE/AFP via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 18: This 18 August 1998 file photo shows St. Louis Cardinals player Mark McGwire (R) hugging Chicago Cubs player Sammy Sosa before their game at Wrigley Field in Chicago, IL. Currently McGwire has 59 homeruns and Sosa 56, giving both players a chance to break the single season record of 61 set in 1961 by New York Yankees player Roger Maris. Despite the competition between them to be the first to break the record, they are close friends. (Photo credit should read FILE/AFP via Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
3 of 3
Next
Chicago Cubs
C. Schilling, R. Palmeiro, M. McGwire and S. Sosa / Chicago Cubs (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) /

Chicago Cubs: Two sides to every story

“If we only knew then just how complex our feelings about it all would eventually become.” As a teaser for the documentary, there’s really nothing else that needs to be said.

There are sure to be wonderful feel-good moments that spark up nostalgia in even the most hardened and unemotional Cubs fans while watching this documentary on the great home run chase of 1998. What there is also sure to be, amongst the promised lengthy commentary from McGwire and Sosa (as well as anyone else they end up interviewing for the doc), is some darkness. Both Sosa and McGwire experienced rather infamous falls from grace, both due to PEDs and their own behavior/denial about said enhancers.

McGwire has gotten back into the game and has repaired some of the damage done to his persona and name, but Sosa has remained an outcast to a team, city, and institution that lives for its heroes and their achievements. Even with the PED cloud hanging over Sosa, fans would surely embrace Sosa and welcome him back into the fold with an apology for the way things came to an end in Chicago.

Time heals all wounds, but Sosa hasn’t ever fully owned up to or stood accountable for his demise in the Windy City. And it’s a shame, because he’s one of the best players to ever put on blue pinstripes. He ushered in an era in baseball and for the Cubs in which the city, ownership, and team could not longer sit around and be lovable losers. Sosa made Cubs baseball must-watch TV and an event that you couldn’t take your eyes off.

Next. Cubs employees get pay cuts. dark

He wasn’t able to see that success to fruition in the same was as that other Chicago guy from 1998, but he could certainly make some amends and garner some love from a fanbase who once adored him almost as much as Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks. If Sosa learns anything from Jordan and his documentary, perhaps some apologies and amends will be made in Long Gone Summer and afterwards with the chatter and conversation that will surely follow its long-anticipated debut.

facebooktwitterreddit