Cubs’ Nico Hoerner making a difference in Chicago

Nico Hoerner, Chicago Cubs (Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images)
Nico Hoerner, Chicago Cubs (Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images) /
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The Chicago Cubs’ Nico Hoerner is making a difference in his community. He started a new podcast, and he created a Cameo app on Twitter to help out school kids.

The Chicago Cubs’ Nico Hoerner has yet to make the Opening Day roster, obviously. But he has a knack for multimedia. He started a podcast, and he launched a fundraiser on the Cameo app on Twitter to help provide remote learning resources to Chicago Public Schools kids through Children First Fund.

The podcast called ‘the Compound’ has Hoerner, Dakota Mekkes, Ian Happ and Zack Short at the helm. The first episode consisted of the best and the worst of their days, their best lineups for a Game 7 World Series and more. It’s more than fitting since they are at the compound in Mesa, Arizona. And they’ve garnered a ‘celebrity’ talent from Jeff Garlin to Kyle Schwarber. They hope to gain a following with stars.

"“It’s so cool for me. I love talking to people who have different baseball stories. …[Garlin] was amazing. I wish we could have played the full thing. … He’s very genuine and heartfelt in his connection to the Cubs.” h/t Gordon Wittenmyer, NBC Chicago"

As far as the COVID-19 virus, he’s in a good spot–up until Arizona ‘got with it.’

"“It was bad for a while,” he said during Wednesday’s conversation by phone. “I was a little nervous going to the store. Not for myself. Arizona was a little late making [precautions] serious on people, and there were a lot of older people out and about."

Hoerner and his family are safe. He checks on them regularly, and he gets together on Zoom with Cubs teammates. And then their taking cues from MLB looking for a sign baseball will be back. And they were then deciphering clues on Chase Field. Remember Arizona? Still, an experimental time with seven-inning games, automatic strike zone and expanded rosters.

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It’s a trying time for all of us. The COVID-19 pandemic and more are keeping us at home. Baseball isn’t going to start until at least May–or later. I write about it. Do you know how stressful that is? But I digress—no use crying over spilled milk–or the coronavirus.

It’s part of ‘staying sane.’ The Cubs–and the rest of the league–are without baseball for the time being. Stay safe out there. There will be baseball, I’m sure of it.