Some of the Chicago Cubs best and worst moves at the trade deadline

bthomas
CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 18: Jake Arrieta #49 of the Chicago Cubs receives a standing ovation after being relieved in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers during game four of the National League Championship Series at Wrigley Field on October 18, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 18: Jake Arrieta #49 of the Chicago Cubs receives a standing ovation after being relieved in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers during game four of the National League Championship Series at Wrigley Field on October 18, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)
(Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images) /

Chicago Cubs swindle the Orioles for Arrieta and Strop

For the second season in a row, the Cubs found a way to deal a pitcher having a career-year on the final year of their contract for a lopsided return. They were able to flip Scott Feldman and Steve Clevenger for Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop and the rest is history.

Arrieta, of course, went on to become one of the most dominant pitchers in Cubs history. He won the NL Cy Young in 2015 behind one of the greatest second-half pitching performances ever, where he went 12-1 to the tune of a 0.75 ERA in 15 starts.

He was instrumental in the Cubs winning the World Series in 2016 where he went 2-0 in the seven game series. Throughout the Cubs success he made a total of nine postseason starts.

Over his five years with the Cubs, Arrieta started 128 games and won 68 of those contests. He posted a 2.73 ERA and also threw two no-hitters.

While Arrieta certainly steals most of the spotlight in this deal, Strop was a huge piece to get back. Over the last seven years, Strop has appeared in 393 games and pitched 359 innings for the Cubs. He’s posted a 2.83 ERA and is arguably one of the best relievers in Cubs history.

On the other hand, Feldman did not pitch nearly as well in Baltimore as he did in Chicago. He made 15 starts for the Orioles who failed to make the playoffs in the push for the postseason. Feldman ended up walking away at the end of the season and signing with the Houston Astros.

This trade might not just be the best deadline deal in Cubs history, but it might be the best deal in Cubs history, period. How the Cubs were able to acquire both Arrieta and Strop for the likes of Feldman and Clevenger, we may never know.

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