Chicago Cubs News

The Chicago Cubs have pieces available if they wish to make a big trade

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October 13, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago Cubs second baseman Javier Baez (9) hits a three run home run in the second inning against St. Louis Cardinals in game four of the NLDS at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports
October 13, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago Cubs second baseman Javier Baez (9) hits a three run home run in the second inning against St. Louis Cardinals in game four of the NLDS at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports /
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Dan Vogelbach

Oct. 9, 2014; Mesa, AZ, USA; Chicago Cubs first baseman Dan Vogelbach plays for the Mesa Solar Sox against the Salt River Rafters during an Arizona Fall League game at Cubs Park. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports
Oct. 9, 2014; Mesa, AZ, USA; Chicago Cubs first baseman Dan Vogelbach plays for the Mesa Solar Sox against the Salt River Rafters during an Arizona Fall League game at Cubs Park. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports /

Out of any player on this list, Dan Vogelbach is the most likely to be dealt if the Cubs make a trade. Vogelbach, 23, is a 6’0″, 250 pound first baseman known for being a power hitter. Sound familiar? Current Cubs’ first baseman All Star first baseman Anthony Rizzo is 6’3″, 240 pounds and has hit 30 home runs in back-to-back seasons.

Not only is Rizzo a similar and proven version of Vogelbach, he also recently signed a contract extension that is very team friendly. Rizzo signed a 7-year contract extension in 2013 for just $41 million, a bargain deal for the Cubs considering the money that has been thrown around in baseball lately (Giancarlo Stanton was signed to a 13-year, $325 million extension after the 2014 season).

With talks of the National League possibly adding a designated hitter for the 2017 season, it might be worth it for the Cubs to keep Vogelbach in the minor leagues this season to see what happens. However, there are many players on the current roster who could play DH on a daily basis (Schwarber, Soler, Báez) simply to keep their powerful bats in the lineup.

Basically, Vogelbach has no place on the Cubs as long as Rizzo is in town and entrenched at first base. If the National League adds the designated hitter to its rules, Vogelbach could potentially stay. Because it does not have one right now means his trade to the American League is simply a matter of when, not if.

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